Finding a job after Japan

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Finding a job after Japan

Unread postby Shawn » Tue Dec 27, 2005 6:49 pm

An interesting article in the Japan Times on life after eikaiwa. Definitely required reading.
http://www.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/get ... 1227zg.htm
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Unread postby MacGyver » Tue Dec 27, 2005 6:56 pm

Hmmm....read it in this morning's paper. Pretty much commonsense if you ask me....
"Yous guys talk a lotta shit. I'm much more smarter than all a yous." - Samurai Jerk after being owned by the Let's Japan crew.
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Unread postby Shawn » Tue Dec 27, 2005 9:32 pm

Common sense, yes, but I think it's easy to lose track given the ease of the job and partying one does. :P

It's interesting that taking a stab at translation wasn't mentioned. Practically every native english speaker I know who has gone on to become a translator has started in eikaiwa.
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Unread postby senseiman » Wed Dec 28, 2005 6:19 am

Cool article. When I came back this year for the first three months I didn't know if I had gotten accepted into school or not so I did a job hunt looking for full time work.

What a nightmare that was. I sent out dozens of resumes and only got one interview - for a crappy minimum wage hotel job. I did that job for a little over a week before getting laid off. I was freaking out at that point, visioning myself being 29, married with a university degree and working at McDonald's for a living. I got my acceptance letter a few days later and I believe that was the most relieved I have ever been in my life.

Lesson to be learned: Before you go back home have a plan!!!
祇園精舎の鐘の聲、諸行無常の響あり。娑羅雙樹の花の色、盛者必衰のことわりをあらはす。おごれる人も久しからず、唯春の夜の夢のごとし。たけき者も遂にほろびぬ、偏に風の前の塵に同じ。
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Unread postby Julia » Thu Dec 29, 2005 5:19 am

senseiman wrote:Lesson to be learned: Before you go back home have a plan!!!



Definitely.

In addition to a plan, I think it's also good to have money saved up. It's good to save as much money as possible before going home -- to have it in case the job search takes a long time.

I had a plan for what to do after leaving Japan and coming home -- work a temp job for the summer, then enter a convent in September.

Well, I did do the temp job, but I never got to the convent. I got cold feet about it, and decided against it -- "at least for now" is what I was thinking at the time.

Then, I met someone, and we've been "an item" since August, and though it's only been a few months, the relationship's long-term prospects are looking very good. So it's looking more and more like the convent isn't going to ever happen.

Three months ago I started a permanent full-time job working for the archdiocese. It doesn't pay a lot, but it pays enough, and it's what I want to do right now.

"Have a plan" is definitely great advice. It doesn't necessarily need to be a long-term plan, but at least have a short-term one because you'll be more likely to land on your feet that way.
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