What's happened to Eikaiwa?

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Edogaijin
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Re: What's happened to Eikaiwa?

Unread post by Edogaijin » Fri Mar 31, 2017 4:43 pm

I had a great year last year with lots of new students. Lost a few recently due to scheduling. Can't get the right students for their classes all in the one place at the same time. The local Japanese competitor down the road who was teaching out of his home has just built a 3 story building with the 1st floor full of classrooms. I think he's also hired some gaijin teachers... so all the new taiken lessons are going there... I've had no calls yet. May have to move location again. On the other hand I may scale down and join the gym again. Work or health... hard for me to find a balance... I put my prices up last year but still got a lot...With the competition I may appear expensive now... can't win...
[url=http://www.japanichiban.com].....?.....[/url]

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Re: What's happened to Eikaiwa?

Unread post by Shawn » Tue Apr 04, 2017 6:13 pm

Inakanosensei wrote:
Fri Mar 31, 2017 12:36 pm
I might be doing coursework from home next year and I thought about going back to Japan to work so I can support myself while doing this. Are there many eikaiwa jobs around? Even the not-so-good ones? When I left Japan in late 2011 the ship seemed to be sinking and my salary and working conditions (with Intercrap) seemed to be getting worse year by year. But there is not much work here in this part of Florida, either. Any suggestions, opinions, etc. would be greatly appreciated.
Have you looked at the job boards on GaijinPot and Daijob? There's also https://www.japanenglishteacher.com/
and
http://www.ohayosensei.com/current-edition.html

That will give you an idea of what's out there.

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Re: What's happened to Eikaiwa?

Unread post by Inakanosensei » Sun Apr 09, 2017 1:32 pm

Thank you, Shawn.

I was at the TESOL Conference in Seattle last month and Westgate was recruiting there. The short-term contracts and working at a university sounded great to me, but then I saw what was said about them here at LJ and other sites. I will definitely have a look at the websites you recommended.

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Re: What's happened to Eikaiwa?

Unread post by BartenBotflyVB » Sun Jul 02, 2017 7:47 pm

senseiman wrote:
Mon Mar 27, 2017 12:06 pm
change to the Labor Contracts Act that came into effect in 2013 and likely has major implications for Eikaiwa teachers.

Under the Act anyone on a fixed term contract (such as the 1 year contracts standard in the industry) who has worked for five years with the same employer can demand to be turned into a permanent employee (which the employer must grant).

This on its face is intended to help the precariat stuck in short term contracts be turned into permanent employees. But in practice it is a disaster for everyone on such contracts for two reasons:

1) the law does not apply retroactively to people who have already been employed for five years. Basically the clock started ticking from 2013 when the law came into effect, so the first batch of people eligible to make such demands will gain such right in 2018.

2) the law does not prevent an employer from simply firing or non-renewing someone when they have worked for 4 years and 364 days with the employer.

Because of these two loopholes, everyone working in an Eikaiwa job now who is approaching five years of service is at very high risk of being fired.

This is becoming a battlefield on university campuses right now since a large portion of professors are now on short term contracts rather than in tenured positions like they used to be. The University of Tsukuba summarily announced a few months ago that its entire contract workforce of professors (nearly 3000 people) would not have their contracts renewed once they reached five years, specifically to avoid having to hire them permanently. And pretty much all new positions being advertised in academia are explicitly limited to five year, non renewable terms for this reason.

So the days of those lifer Eikaiwa drones working for AEON or NOVA (or whatever its called now) on 1 year contracts forever are definitely over. Five years and you are out is now the law of the land.
I think the teachers have 10 years from 2013, so 5 more years. Then its going to be a massive merry go round of ever diminishing jobs. Me though, I7M just a dogsbody assistant cunt at my part-time dolly bird college gig and will have to scab around for Mons and Tues next year. shit about to hit the fan big time at the unis, all those white lab-coated busy bodies pretending to do "administrative work" are going to get told thank you for 10 years of loyal service now please get the fuck out. I wonder if they even know the new law even exists? Nice work, Japan. Way to bark your shins on the cunt of life.

Maybe, in a classically Japanese time-wasting workspace manoeuvre, the admin sections will actually enjoy having more pointless paper-shuffling to do, eg Tohoku Uni, having to hire 3,000 new staff to replace the ones they just fired so everyone can look busy for a while. Say, the next 5 years. Maybe they’ll have to hire more people to help with the hiring of the new people haha. Pythonian. Maybe some of the 3,000 they just fired could apply to do that job. Sounds like an economic stimulus package drawn up by Gene Gunston with his fucken chainsaw. In the snow. At night.

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senseiman
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Re: What's happened to Eikaiwa?

Unread post by senseiman » Mon Jul 03, 2017 2:35 pm

Its actually only people in research positions who get 10 years, and they are a pretty small proportion. Everyone else, including teachers, is facing the axe or permanent employment next year.

The only silver lining is that the labor market is so tight right now that some employers might actually decide its worth it to give permanent status to people just to keep them on.
祇園精舎の鐘の聲、諸行無常の響あり。娑羅雙樹の花の色、盛者必衰のことわりをあらはす。おごれる人も久しからず、唯春の夜の夢のごとし。たけき者も遂にほろびぬ、偏に風の前の塵に同じ。

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Re: What's happened to Eikaiwa?

Unread post by Junken Master » Thu Jul 06, 2017 8:38 pm

BartenBotflyVB wrote:
Sun Jul 02, 2017 7:47 pm
I'm just a dogsbody assistant cunt
Haha don't be too hard on yourself there! :D

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Re: What's happened to Eikaiwa?

Unread post by In The Know » Mon Jul 24, 2017 10:31 pm

senseiman wrote:
Mon Mar 27, 2017 12:06 pm
So the days of those lifer Eikaiwa drones working for AEON or NOVA (or whatever its called now) on 1 year contracts forever are definitely over. Five years and you are out is now the law of the land.
Five years? :omfg: After doing two years at NOVA full-time (5 days a week, 8 lessons a day) I left feeling like I had just undergone a lobotomy that had gone badly. I still have LSD-like flashbacks that haunt me to this day. :cry:

The Golden Age of Eikaiwa is certainly over. The days of landing in Japan on Monday and signing a teaching contract on Tuesday are over. The eikaiwa positions just don't seem to be there anymore.

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Re: What's happened to Eikaiwa?

Unread post by BergKatse » Tue Jul 25, 2017 11:07 am

Not sure if this is relevant, but anyway...

Yesterday in central Osaka, the people sat next to me were conducting an interview for an English teaching position. What struck me was that none of the interviewers or the interviewee were native speakers of English but all of them spoke very well. All of them -- Japanese and non-Japanese -- spoke Japanese quite fluently, too. Throughout the interview, they switched back and forth between English and Japanese comfortably.

It made me wonder whether that's the kind of people most prized in the Eikaiwa industry these days... i.e., not necessarily an NES, but "international" and multilingual with good Japanese skills.

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senseiman
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Re: What's happened to Eikaiwa?

Unread post by senseiman » Wed Jul 26, 2017 1:46 pm

In The Know wrote:
Mon Jul 24, 2017 10:31 pm

Five years? :omfg: After doing two years at NOVA full-time (5 days a week, 8 lessons a day) I left feeling like I had just undergone a lobotomy that had gone badly. I still have LSD-like flashbacks that haunt me to this day. :cry:

The Golden Age of Eikaiwa is certainly over. The days of landing in Japan on Monday and signing a teaching contract on Tuesday are over. The eikaiwa positions just don't seem to be there anymore.
I did one year at GEOS and then two years at AEON and I'm glad I didn't do more than that. I remember there were a lot of guys who had been around for 5-10 years or so when I worked there, most of them working as trainers or something at head office. I always used to wonder about them.
Yesterday in central Osaka, the people sat next to me were conducting an interview for an English teaching position. What struck me was that none of the interviewers or the interviewee were native speakers of English but all of them spoke very well. All of them -- Japanese and non-Japanese -- spoke Japanese quite fluently, too. Throughout the interview, they switched back and forth between English and Japanese comfortably.

It made me wonder whether that's the kind of people most prized in the Eikaiwa industry these days... i.e., not necessarily an NES, but "international" and multilingual with good Japanese skills.
One thing that has changed, which might explain that, is the high growth in the number of foreign university students in Japan. 15 years ago their numbers were so insignificant as to barely be noticable. But in the past decade universities here have been rapidly expanding their internationalization and acceptance of foreign students, with most of the leading universities having undergraduate and graduate programs conducted in English and large numbers of foreign students in them (not exchange students mind you, but students enrolled in 4 year degree programs). At its root this is driven by the demographic crisis - the population of Japanese 18 year olds is going down each year so they need to get students from somewhere. Its also driven by the need to compete internationally - Japanese universities are trying to catch up in the international rankings and that is one way of doing so.

Most of the foreign students coming in are from Asian countries, so the population of young, well educated fluent but not native English speakers who also speak Japanese (because they study it at University too) has been increasing at a rapid rate. Teaching English on the side is an easy way for them to make money so I wouldn't be surprised if they are moving into the market. They have the whole skill set (save maybe an accent) as stereotypical Eikaiwa newbie and are way easier to hire (and most will work for less).
祇園精舎の鐘の聲、諸行無常の響あり。娑羅雙樹の花の色、盛者必衰のことわりをあらはす。おごれる人も久しからず、唯春の夜の夢のごとし。たけき者も遂にほろびぬ、偏に風の前の塵に同じ。

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