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Welcome to Japan: Smile for the Camera, Please

Via Debito's blog, we learn that by November this year, all visitors to Japan will be fingerprinted and photographed in the name of protecting Japan's security. Watch the cheesy video in English here.

According to the video, this is all in the name of ensuring the security of Japan and your protection during your stay in Japan. The video goes off the deep end when it invokes the 9/11 terrorist attacks. It then proceeds to list a series of recent terrorist attack none of which occurred in Japan. Thanks to the global war on terror, you will be regarded as a potential terrorist. Unless you are under the age of 16, hold a permanent resident visa or are on official business such as a diplomat or other government official, you'll have to live with it.

Japan, of course, has every right to take measures to protect itself, but what is cause for concern is that this information is digital, and the bumbling idiots in government seem to have a nasty habit of leaking information to the Internet via file trading software called Winny. Liberal Japan has a good write up on past leaks involving Winny.

The preponderance of Winny-related accidents is really amazing. Despite virtually blanket coverage in the Japanese media on the dangers of Winny, government officials and the military continue to use the software.

I have no idea how or who will store our photos and fingerprints, but if the police can lose 10,000 crime files and the Maritime Self Defense Forces leak secret information about its Aegis destroyers, there is every reason to believe the government will screw this up, too.

Comments

If they just lose the info like the pension records i don't mind so much... The way the Government looks after their own people, it wouldn't go down well if they were overly accommodating to mangy foreigners.

Japan’s defense posture, like America’s, is under­going a fundamental transformation. This is a posi­tive development in the maturation and evolution of the U.S.–Japan alliance and is long overdue given the profound changes in the international security environment. Yet many challenges lie ahead.

Beyond the three traditional religions, many Japanese today are turning to a great variety of popular religious movements normally lumped together under the name "new religions." These religions draw on the concept of Shinto, Buddhism, and folk superstition and have developed in part to meet the social needs of elements of the population.

Japan, of course, has every right to take measures to protect itself, but what is cause for concern is that this information is digital, and the bumbling idiots in government seem to have a nasty habit of leaking information to the Internet via file trading software called Winny

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